Here's why the gardens at St Andrew's are looking a little bare - (hint) they will soon look a lot better

The hellebores have been left as they serve as a food source for insects.The hellebores have been left as they serve as a food source for insects.
The hellebores have been left as they serve as a food source for insects. | jpimedia
The gardens are going to look great in the coming months

Work is underway to transform the gardens at St Andrew's Church - with those involved in the project hoping for a summer unveiling.

The work comes after a fundraising campaign which ended last year with the raising of £46,582.

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Despite coverage in the local press and information shared online and through the community, some Rugbeians were unaware of the project - with some concerned over the removal of bushes and plants.

Ground has been cleared to make way for lots of new features.Ground has been cleared to make way for lots of new features.
Ground has been cleared to make way for lots of new features. | jpimedia

Amber Potter, events manager at St Andrew's, invited the Advertiser to come and hear more about the exciting plans for the space.

The plants and bushes which have been removed were not pollinators and, Amber said, had become home to rats and discarded needles.

Plants left include hellebores, which provide an emergency food source for insects because they bloom before many other species.

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Amber said that, where possible, trees will be left as they are.

The preparations for the specially commissioned sculpture.The preparations for the specially commissioned sculpture.
The preparations for the specially commissioned sculpture. | jpimedia

This includes the tall London planes which line parts of the garden and the acer tree growing close to the entrance to the Church Walk apartments.

The only tree which may have to be felled is the aging silver birch - which Amber said is coming to the end of its lifespan and may pose a threat as it starts dropping branches.

Improvements will include the addition of a solar charging bench - giving everyone from business people to rough sleepers somewhere to charge their devices.

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A bee-friendly garden, complete with a specially-commissioned sculpture where people can make a donation to have their loved ones remembered will also be added.

The garden will be kept more open in order to both provide more open space for community events and discourage anti-social behaviour.

Amber said all those involved in the project hope it will give the town centre a boost.

She added that community spaces may be crucial the life of town centres across the country.

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Amber said she would like to give a special thanks the Rugby-based Melbros Building Supplies, who have saved the project thousands of pounds by lending out harris fencing to secure the perimeter.

To learn more about the project, visit www.spacehive.com/standrewsrugby

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