Plans for oak-built stable in a village near Warwick rejected by councillors despite support from neighbours

Three people living near the site urged members of Warwick District Council’s planning committee to grant permission

Plans for an oak-built stable with tiled roof and rooflights have been thrown out by councillors even though neighbours of the proposed shelter in Haseley were in favour.

Three people living near the site in Firs Lane urged members of Warwick District Council’s planning committee to go against the recommendation of their planning officer and grant permission when they met on last night (Tuesday May 18).

The application, from Jeremy Smith, was for an L-shaped building housing two stables and a secure store in a field next to his home.

Plans for an oak-built stable have been thrown out by councillors even though neighbours of the proposed shelter in Haseley were in favour

The plans had been amended by removing a tack room but officers were unhappy about the scale of the building which would have been in the green belt.

A planning report considered by councillors explained: “Small stables, which are single storey and positioned usually within an inconspicuous location within a paddock of an appropriate size are unlikely to cause harm to openness and form part of the rural landscape.

“The proposed stables, however, are significantly larger than the traditional small scale equestrian development one would expect within a field of this size.

"The proposal includes a large secure store, which would be far greater in height, scale and mass than a traditional stable block.”

Questions were also raised over the building materials for the structure.

Planning officer Andrew Tew told the meeting: “When we see buildings for agriculture and equestrian purposes we expect to see them in utilitarian fashion which would usually be rolled steel.

"We would not expect to see something in oak with a slate room and rooflights and domestic features.

“Historic buildings in the green belt would have been built in a different way 100 or 200 years ago but we are dealing with new buildings with materials that are cost effective.”

Mr Tew added that the proposed building would also be more than three times larger than a dilapidated brick-built store that it would be replacing.

Cllr James Kennedy (Green, Kenilworth Park Hill) said: “What I appear to be hearing is that this design is too nice for the stable because it uses nice oak and has a tiled roof - we don’t expect horses to live in such accommodation. Is that really a planning issue?”

But Mr Tew responded that the application had to be fit for purpose and added: “By focussing on the design we are moving away from the main issue which is the uplift in size. We are looking for a small incremental uplift not something that is three times the size.”

Councillors voted to refuse planning permission.