Schools across Warwickshire earmarked for measures to improve road safety

A mobile enforcement vehicle will be leased by the county council and work will be carried out to ensure that road markings and signage comply with the latest traffic regulations.

Seventy priority schools have been earmarked as part of a series of measures aimed at improving safety on the roads around Warwickshire’s primary schools.

A mobile enforcement vehicle will be leased by the county council and work will be carried out to ensure that road markings and signage comply with the latest traffic regulations.

A report considered by councillors at this week’s communities overview and scrutiny committee explained that other schools will be targeted in future years but a traffic regulation order covering the entire county would be put in place at the start of the campaign.

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Other measures will see the remarking of the zig-zag keep clear zones outside schools with time plates installed explaining to motorists when the restrictions were in place.

The enforcement vehicle would patrol clusters of schools each day prior to penalty charge notices being issued and officers plan to relaunch the ‘Cars and Kids Don’t Mix’ school safety campaign.

The report explained: “The benefit of an enforcement vehicle is in its ability to patrol several schools in an area during their busiest hours before and after school, covering more areas and adding a visible presence.

"Area clusters will be created enabling enforcement of all schools in an area on a rotational schedule.

“Experience from other councils operating mobile camera enforcement has demonstrated that visibility of enforcement to the public can lead to an improvement in compliance with the regulations and a reduction in congestion around schools.

"The police are in support of tackling non-compliance using this mode of enforcement.”

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But there was a warning that the success of the clampdown could have an impact on those living in neighbouring roads with parents parking elsewhere in the neighbourhood at drop-off and pick-up times.

Emily Brough, one of the officers tasked with rolling out the measures, told the meeting: “I would predict that behaviour will change and I am hoping that people will park further away from the schools. Naturally that will affect streets further out but ultimately it will be beneficial for the school areas.”

She added that the enforcement vehicle would be leased on a four-year deal.