Southam swimming teacher recalls being rescued from water as a child to inspire others to follow in her footsteps

Teenager Alisha Zadziorska-Brown wants to ensure more youngsters do not get into the same situation as she did when she was on holiday several years ago

Southam teenager Alisha Zadziorska-Brown has become a fully-qualified swim teacher – in a bid to ensure youngsters don’t get into trouble in water as she did as a child. Picture submitted.
Southam teenager Alisha Zadziorska-Brown has become a fully-qualified swim teacher – in a bid to ensure youngsters don’t get into trouble in water as she did as a child. Picture submitted.

A fully-qualified Southam swimming teacher is encouraging others to follow in her footsteps so they can ensure more youngsters do not get into difficulty in deep water like she did when she was a child.

Alisha Zadziorska-Brown, who is now a teenager, had to be rescued by a life guard when she had become separated from her family and struggled to stay afloat in deep water while she was on holiday several years ago.

The incident had a life-changing impact on her and made her determined to help others.

She developed a passion for swimming and, after completing her A levels, took both her Level 1 and Level 2 swim teacher qualifications after previously working as a lifeguard.

Having qualified in December 2021, she is now keen to encourage others to consider becoming a swimming teacher as a career.

She said: “I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to do my courses which I really enjoyed, and now I am teaching as much as I can.

“I thought that if I am making that change for myself, that I could give back to the community and do my part to support anyone who wants to improve their swimming ability.”

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Swim England’s research shows that 96 per cent of swimming teachers in the UK love their job, and love giving back to the community to support children in developing an essential life skill.

Alisha said: “It’s a rewarding career, especially working with younger children where you see them respond to you, making learning as fun as possible.

“The progress they make, no matter how small, even putting their face in the water for the first time, I want them to know that through lessons they will improve and amaze themselves.

“If I can help anyone who previously might not have been fully safe, to get to a level where they can enjoy being in the water, that side of my job makes me really happy.”

Alisha is helping to launch Swim England’s latest Love Swimming campaign.

Those who are interested in becoming a swimming teacher can visit swimming.org/ios/loveswimming