Volunteers behind historic Warwick garden recognised with Queen's Award

The project was set up to restore the 18th Century kitchen garden, providing educational opportunities for people of all abilities and leisure activities for the wider community

Volunteers who work at a historic garden in Warwick have been recognised with a Queen's Award.

The Guy’s Cliffe Walled Garden (GCWG) volunteers have been honoured with The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service, which is the highest award a voluntary group can receive in the UK.

The project was set up to restore the 18th Century kitchen garden, providing educational opportunities for people of all abilities and leisure activities for the wider community.

The Guy’s Cliffe Walled Garden (GCWG) volunteers have been honoured with The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service, which is the highest award a voluntary group can receive in the UK. Photo supplied

GCWG is one of 241 charities, social enterprises and voluntary groups to receive the prestigious award this year.

The number of nominations remains high year on year, showing that the voluntary sector is thriving and full of innovative ideas to make life better for those around them.

The Queen’s Award for Voluntary Service aims to recognise outstanding work by volunteer groups to benefit their local communities.

It was created in 2002 to celebrate The Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

Recipients are announced each year on June 2, the anniversary of The Queen’s Coronation.

Representatives of GCWG will receive the award crystal and certificate from Timothy Cox, Lord-Lieutenant of Warwickshire later this summer.

Sarah Ridgeway, GCWG trustee, said: “I am delighted that the project has been recognised; the volunteers have made a great start, on which we can now build towards achieving our objectives.

"It’s been a tough year for everyone and COVID has reminded all of us how important it is that we all work together helping others.

"The garden has been growing fruit and vegetables for our local foodbanks and night shelter and will continue to do so, and as we come out of lockdown, we will be able to again work with schools, groups with special needs and others.

"Our volunteers are a key part of this and I thank them for all their help.”