Warwick Rotary helps to fund new health initiative for Post-Polio Syndrome

People who contracted polio in the past are affected in later life by a range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, breathing problems and other effects making life increasingly difficult

A brand new physiotherapy programme has been launched to help those suffering from Post Polio Syndrome and has been helped by funding from Warwick Rotary Club.

Post-Polio Syndrome is a legacy of polio.

People who contracted polio in the past are affected in later life by a range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, breathing problems and other effects making life increasingly difficult.

The programme, the first of its kind, is being delivered by PhysioFunction in Northampton and incorporates aquatic and land-based physiotherapy. Photo supplied

The programme, the first of its kind is being delivered by PhysioFunction in Northampton and incorporates aquatic and land-based physiotherapy.

A number of participants are from Northampton, but through the addition of tele-rehab during lockdown, people can now join in from a much wider area.

Kirsten Good, the leading physiotherapist who has initiated the programme said: “We have a number of polio survivors attending our groups every week, and the funding we have had to subsidise the programme has made it very affordable for them.”

Warwick Rotary Club has many associations with the British Polio Fellowship.

The programme, the first of its kind, is being delivered by PhysioFunction in Northampton and incorporates aquatic and land-based physiotherapy. Photo supplied

Two years ago the club used an article in the local press to invite people to a tea party which brought many polio survivors from Warwick and Leamington together to find out about the work of the British Polio Fellowship.

Many have gone on to benefit from the work of the Fellowship.

Many may remember the immunisation programme of the 50s and 60s to ensure all children were vaccinated against the crippling disease of polio.

Iron lungs to help with breathing, isolation hospitals, no contact with parents, callipers and heavy boots often the legacy.

The polio virus was beaten in the UK but not all children received the vaccine in time, although many have recovered, survivors still feel the effects today and may need physiotherapy as they age and muscles deteriorate.

This is why this programme is so valuable to them.

The Polio Eradication programme is a wonderful example of nations and organisations working together to help eradicate a crippling disease such as polio world-wide.

Rotary is very much part of this and welcomes new members to help it continue its work.