Work to improve pathways around Kenilworth Castle - which also unearthed artifacts - is now complete

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A project to improve pathways around Kenilworth Castle, which also unearthed catapult shots from the 1200s, has now been completed.

Works inside and outside the castle walls started in early January and finished in June, made possible by the support of the FCC Communities Foundation and several local organisations.

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An opening ceremony for the new pathways took place on Tuesday (July 9) at Kenilworth Castle.

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Works to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English HeritageWorks to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage
Works to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage

The ruins of the 12th century Norman castle and 16th century palace are free to enter for residents of Kenilworth and the land outside the castle walls has long been a well-trodden local walking route.

Responding to visitor and community feedback about pedestrian access around the site, English Heritage worked on a project to create new pathways and make improvements to the existing ones.

Wheelchair users, pushchair users and people with limited mobility can use an even pathway through the Inner Court, wider pathways elsewhere and ramps between different parts of the site.

On permissive pathways outside the castle, the existing trails have been excavated and a defined pathway has been created.

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The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English HeritageThe £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage
The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage

The project was mainly funded by FCC Communities Foundation, who granted £250,000 for the works.

Further donations were received from Kenilworth-based organisations, including the Kenilworth Roundtable, Kenilworth Rotary Club and Kenilworth Lions.

During the works, eight 13th century catapult shots were found perfectly preserved outside the walls.

The shots are remnants of the siege of Kenilworth Castle in 1266, which lasted 172 days. The stone spheres are of varying sizes, with the largest weighing 105kg and the smallest 1kg.

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Works to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English HeritageWorks to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage
Works to improve existing pathways and add new routes around Kenilworth Castle are now complete. The £250k project started in January and ended in June and the paths were officially opened on Tuesday (July 9) .Photo supplied by English Heritage

Scott Elson, Kenilworth Castle site manager, said “We’re thrilled at the completion of this important project, which we believe will have a meaningful impact on the experience at the castle for our Kenilworth neighbours and for visitors from further afield.

"As an independent charity, English Heritage would not have been able to commence the works without the support of the FCC Communities Foundation, to whom we are very grateful.”

Cheryl Raynor, FCC Communities Foundation spokesperson added: “We are delighted to have supported English Heritage with this valuable project to improve pedestrian accessibility at the site and hope visitors and the local community enjoy the new pathways.

"The discovery of the catapult shots is simply incredible, and we can’t wait to see them on display in the future.”

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