Charity ambassador meets school children in Warwick to encourage open conversations about health

The presentation focused specifically on testicular cancer, which affects thousands of young men in the UK.

Young people at a school in Warwick have been encouraged to have open conversations about important health issues such as cancer.

Rosie Rudin, who recently took up the role of university ambassador for testicular cancer charity The OddBalls Foundation, visited Myton School to talk to pupils about the disease.

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Rosie Rudin ambassador for The OddBalls Foundation speaks to pupils at Myton School in Warwick. Photo supplied

Rosie, 23, who is studying Graduate Medicine at the University of Warwick, was invited to speak at the school by Julie Stevens, director of Post-16 Learning and Achievement.

In a presentation to 190 students that set out to break down the stigma of talking openly about cancer, Rosie outlined why it is so important for individuals to check themselves for signs of the disease.

The presentation focused specifically on testicular cancer, which affects thousands of young men in the UK.

Rosie said: “This was the largest school talk that I have delivered to date, which was exciting.

"The sixth formers really engaged with the presentation and were incredibly mature about this sensitive topic.

"I’m hoping that this helped the students to feel comfortable about talking about testicles and to break down the stigma that’s associated with this.”

During her visit, Rosie also encouraged pupils to think and speak openly about health issues, and answered their questions

The OddBalls Foundation was founded in 2015 and is closely associated with colourful underwear brand OddBalls.

The foundation’s university ambassadors visit schools, universities and workplaces, delivering talks and reminding boys and men to check their testicles, removing any embarrassment about that and the disease.