Green light given for new comedy club in Leamington

Comic and owner Ryan Mold told the three-man licensing hearing that he had experience of running similar venues having previously operated a nightclub that opened until 4am and that he ran another comedy club in Banbury.
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Leamington looks set to get a new comedy club after its owner was granted a premises licence for the Moss Street venue this week.

There had been objections from environmental health officers concerned about noise and nuisance coming from Atic to those living nearby but councillors approved the application at the latest meeting of Warwick District Council’s licensing and regulatory panel.

Comic and owner Ryan Mold told the three-man hearing that he had experience of running similar venues having previously operated a nightclub that opened until 4am and that he ran another comedy club in Banbury.

He said: “What I am proposing for Leamington is a comedy club, so reducing the hours significantly to what I have had in the past and not having to worry about live music.

"The reason for this is that I’m getting a bit older and my focus is now on an earlier night and providing nice entertainment for people.“There is a real gap in the market in Leamington Spa – there are a few nights that happen but as for a club that trades three to four times a week, there isn’t one.“Weekends will be a combination of touring shows with comedians from around the UK and then, during the week, we will provide the stage for local comedians.“I’m not in the business of annoying anyone locally, I want to be working with people.”

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The venue is under a railway arch near to Moss House – a student accommodation block – and environmental health officer Peter Lawson suggested this meant it was unsuitable for such a venture.In his report he said: “Moss Street is a narrow canyon between the railway viaduct and the façade of Moss House. Unit 1 is situated in a railway arch with the door facing the windows of Moss House.

"It is eight paces off the nearest ground floor window.

“Residents of Moss House are likely to be affected by noise of smokers gathering around the front door, noise break out from entertainment on opening of the door and noise of persons going to and from the premises late at night.

“On balance, environmental health must object to this application.

"We do not feel that there are any conditions that would effectively address the unsuitable location.”

But licensing expert Frank Fender pointed out that not only would the speakers be pointing away from the student flats, the solid brick walls would also provide excellent sound insulation.

He said: “The premises are in a brick built railway arch.

“Bricks have a density to support mainline trains.

"That thickness will provide excellent sound insulation properties.“The main room is only reached by passing through three different doors which means the potential for noise breakout when the entrance is open is vastly reduced.”