Post locker which covered blue plaque dedicated to legendary Warwick boxer has been removed following pressure from residents, councillors and town MP

The large InPost locker had been placed against the wall at the entrance to Sainsbury’s in Saltisford completely obscuring the plaque for Dick Turpin

The InPost Locker was removed from the front of Sainsbury's in Warwick today and the blue plaque dedicated to Dick Turpin can now be seen again. Picture supplied.
The InPost Locker was removed from the front of Sainsbury's in Warwick today and the blue plaque dedicated to Dick Turpin can now be seen again. Picture supplied.

A large post locker which had been thoughtlessly placed on a wall in front of a blue plaque dedicated to a legendary Warwick boxer has now been removed following pressure from residents, councillors and the town’s MP.

The large InPost locker had been placed against the wall at the entrance to Sainsbury’s in Saltisford completely obscuring the plaque for Dick Turpin which had been unveiled there in November last year.

As ew reported earlier, Warwick and Leaminton MP Matt Western said that he was speaking to Sainsbury’s to have the locker removed and that InPost’s actions were “an insult to his [Dick Turpin’s] memory, his legacy, his brothers and the rest of their family and to the boxing community of Warwick and Leamington.”

The unveiling of the blue plaque for legendary boxer Dick Turpin outside Sainsbury's in Saltisford, Warwick, in November 2021. Picture supplied.

He said the campaign to have the locker removed has been successful.

Mr Western said: “The InPost locker covering Dick Turpin's blue plaque has been removed.

“I’ve received an email from the operations director of InPost.

"The company sent workers to remove the parcel locker, and they completed the job in the last hour (ahead of schedule).

InPost's post collection locker is was covering the blue plaque dedicated to legendary Warwick boxer Dick Turpin. The plaque was put up outside Sainsbury's in Saltisford last November. Picture supplied.

“While the firm’s quick response is welcome, there are still questions to be answered to ascertain how this could have been allowed to happen in the first place.

“Along with responding to InPost, I have written to the chief executive of Sainsbury’s asking similar questions so the public can understand why such mistakes were made.

“I am grateful for the apology issued by InPost and expect a similar one from Sainsbury’s.

“Though the staff members in Warwick I’ve heard from have profusely apologised to the Turpin family, which is very welcome.

The Turpins 20th August 1951: British boxer and World Middleweight Champion Randolph Turpin, with his manager and brothers, Dick and Jackie, in New York. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

“Labour town and district councillor Dave Skinner was on hand to see it removed and talk with Sainsbury's staff.

"He first demanded it was removed more than two weeks ago.”

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In 1948, Dick became the first black British boxer to break the so-called ‘colour bar’ – which prevented non-white boxers competing for major titles.

A British and Commonwealth middleweight champion, he was the first black athlete to win a title in any British sport.